Welcome to cranking fans A hangout for pedal pumping lovers

Memories of young girls or moms flooding their engine in hot weather

Description of your first forum.
Post Reply
volodia
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Jun 19, 2019 7:01 pm

Memories of young girls or moms flooding their engine in hot weather

Post by volodia » Wed Jun 19, 2019 7:57 pm

Please share your warm weather start-up stories on car parks during the summer with young driver girls who is flooding and fighting to start their car !

User avatar
Jebifoot
Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2019 11:34 am
Location: Germany

Re: Memories of young girls or moms flooding their engine in hot weather

Post by Jebifoot » Mon Jul 08, 2019 7:35 am

Well, in my youth I remember a few moments where my mother had some starting issues. During this time she owned a small carbureted car with choke. In the summer season her meaning was that she could also coldstart the car without choke.
That resulted in courious moments and resulted mostly in a lot of cranking attempts and sputtering /stalling engine. If she was using the choke in summer she sometimes forgot to push the choke fully in, so after we returned from the beach or from the Supermarket the car won't start. That's why she always primed the gas pedal at least 5 to 6 times before her first starting attempt, during cold and during hot conditions.....
So a few times we left stranded....

CrankyDude
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Jun 05, 2019 7:08 pm

Re: Memories of young girls or moms flooding their engine in hot weather

Post by CrankyDude » Fri Jul 19, 2019 12:14 pm

Our family's first car that I remember was a 1956 Plymouth Suburban station wagon, powder blue. It was built before Chrysler switched over to those whiny starter motors that characterized the sound of every Chrysler-made car from the early sixties to the mid-eighties. I never understood why they choose such a loud, obvious and struggling sound for their starters, especially when they made so many cars for so many years that were notoriously hard to start.

Anyway, that old Plymouth was next to impossible to start after a long wet spell. I remember so many times when my mother got us into the car after a full night of rain and just cranked and cranked, getting more and more frustrated, pumping and begging the car, "c'mon car, c'mon!! Start!" Some mornings she work at it for fifteen minutes or more, that old engine just cranking and cranking, the red dashboard lights flickering and dimming in time to the rhythm of the cranking. She hated to give up, always believing that it would eventually start, but it seldom did. And when she did manage to get it started, it would stall multiple times just getting out of the driveway, then for the first few stop signs (I always loved coasting to a stop as all the red lights on the instrument panel lit up. I knew a long cranking struggle awaited). Eventually the engine warmed up enough to dry out the ignition system and the car ran smoothly.

If my father happened to be around, he'd pull out the shop vac and blow hot air on the ignition system, periodically cranking to see if it would start, which it eventually always did. The difference is that he just gave it relatively short cranks, preferring to wait until the ignition system had dried out enough to produce a spark. But not my mother: she'd keep cranking until the battery started to give out, then curse and tell us she can't get the car started (as if I didn't know!) and we'd go back into the house. When my sister inherited the car and drove it to high school, there were many memorable mornings of cranking, often followed by a three-block walk to the school bus.

Those were such great times! Cars were often hard to start, and people thought nothing of cranking for extended periods of time, trying and trying, over and over again, hoping that the car would start. Nowadays, if a car doesn't start after a couple of cranks, people get out and call a tow truck.

CrankyDude
Posts: 10
Joined: Wed Jun 05, 2019 7:08 pm

Re: Memories of young girls or moms flooding their engine in hot weather

Post by CrankyDude » Fri Jul 19, 2019 12:18 pm

I also remember the time I let my two cute female roommates take my 1970 Volvo to the store. I told them about the manual choke, but neglected to tell them not to use it when the car was warm. It was no more than a five minute drive to the store, which they evidently did with the choke full-on. But twenty minutes later I got a phone call from them: "We can't get the car started!" I told them to push in the choke and crank the car with the pedal to the floor. Eventually it would start. So sorry I wasn't there to actually see that action!

Post Reply